Inkspell Review

The world of words that come to life upon reading aloud continues in a spell like fantasy.

Customary warning: This is a reminder that these are my personal opinions. My thoughts and feelings are not your thoughts and feelings. I may not always be the target  audience for a book; sometimes I am. If I do not like a book, that doesn’t mean you’ll dislike it. If I love a book or simply like a book, you may hate it. Take everything I say with this knowledge. If it sounds interesting to you despite what I’ve said, then go ahead and read it. You’ll only know you like something if you read it yourself.

That being said… Spoilers ahead.




Inkspell by Cornelia Funke

Synopsis From The Book

Although a year has passed, not a day goes by without Meggie thinking of INKHEART, the book whose characters became real. But for Dustfinger, the fire-eater brought into being from words, the need to return to the tale has become desperate. When he finds a crooked storyteller with the ability to read him back, Dustfinger leaves behind his young apprentice Farid and plunges into the medieval world of his past. Distraught, Farid goes in search of Meggie, and before long, both are caught inside the book, too. But the story is threatening to evolve in ways neither of them could ever have imagined.


Initial Thoughts Before Reading:

I was tempted not to read this. First books often act as stand alones, where it could be a story on its own should the author wish. However sequels? If the book is in a trilogy, then the second will end on a cliff hanger. Its the way it is. I don’t make the rules. I simply dread them ever time I see them coming. Whatever, on into Inkspell regardless.

Initial Thoughts After Reading:

It was a long book, but I got through it. There were many battles, many tears, and a heart wrenching sacrifice. Will it result in a happy ending? Probably. I don’t have the third book to know, though. I am excited to see how the world is fixed and how Meggie returns home with her family.

Plot Overview:

This book is long so this is going to be far more brief.

Meggie and her family are now living with Elinor. When Dustfinger is sent back to Inkheart by a man named Orpheus, Farid goes to Meggie to try to get to the story as well. Meggie reads herself and Farid into the story. Orpheus, Basta, and a few others go to Elinor’s house to search for Mo, Meggie, and Resa. Mo and Resa are read into Inkheart with Basta and his crew. Mo is shot and almost dies. Resa regains her voice. While healing Mo is confused for a different character and taken to be executed.

Meggie and Farid find Fenoglio (the author). Meggie works with him to “fix” his story. Dustfinger returns to his life. They cause some chaos, and then go off to save Mo. After many crazy stunts Meggie ends up bargaining for her father’s life with the main bad guy Adderhead. She uses Fenogilo’s words to create a world where she can defeat him and save her father by making Adderhead invincible with a book. The complete it Mo and Meggie go free only to be pushed into war. Farid dies but is brought back to life with Dustfinger giving himself up to the White Women (keepers of death) in his place.

Meggie and Farid go to Fenoglio to bring Dustfinger back, he will not write. They read over Orpheus to write for Fenoglio and to save the story.

What I Liked:

Continuation of the characters, the progressed nicely.

The story arcs and plot. I like how they flowed together within one another.

I loved the danger and sacrifice, the near deaths and the fear that was inflicted within the pages.

How words are used to shape the story through writing and Meggie’s voice. It is reminiscent of a child retelling a story to another child and changing it or altering it as they go.

What I Would Have Liked or Changed:

Nothing I can think of.

Time Taken To Read

8:20 – 9:20 and then 9:25 – 10:10 and then 10:50 11:15 –

Rating: 4/5

Notable Quotes:

None

One thought on “Inkspell Review

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